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Enterprise Servers

Enterprise Servers

Enterprise Servers

An enterprise server is a computer containing programs that collectively serve the needs of an enterprise rather than a single user, department, or specialized application. Historically, mainframe -sized computers have been enterprise servers although they were not referred to as server s until recently. As smaller, usually UNIX -based servers and Wintel computers have become faster and have been provided with enterprise-wide program management capabilities, they also been referred to as enterprise servers. In this usage, an enterprise server is both the computer hardware and its main software, the operating system. Examples are Sun Microsystems' computers with their UNIX -based Solaris or Linux systems, Hewlett-Packard ( HP ) systems, the upper end of Windows 2000 systems, and IBM's iSeries systems (the largest of which is the zSeries 900 -formerly called the S/390 ).

Some companies use enterprise server to describe a "superprogram" that runs under the operating system in a computer and provides services for the system administrator and for the business application program s and more specialized server s that run in the computer. Before this usage originated, such services were sometimes considered part of the operating system itself or came in separate software packages. Originally, many services provided by an enterprise server tended to be available only on IBM or similar main frame computers while less powerful computers ran specialized applications. As these smaller "server" computers (such as those from Sun Microsystems and H-P) became better adapted for business (and recently Internet) applications, the bundle of services required to manage a company-wide set of applications was renamed "the enterprise server." More specialized servers include the Web server , firewall server, database server, and so forth.

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Small Business Servers

Small Business Servers

Small Business Servers

For more than 25 years, Coastline Micro, Inc. has been showing small to medium-sized businesses and enterprises around the country how to get a better return on their investment by optimizing and harnessing the power of their existing IT infrastructure.

 

We understand that the risks of updating legacy infrastructure and outdated platforms can be daunting, costly and time-consuming.

 

Whether you need an inexpensive single processor server for your small business, or for your growing enterprise, Coastline Micro has a server solution to fit your needs.  Our long-standing history as an Intel Premier Provider and SuperMicro Direct Partner ensures you that you can buy with confidence and peace of mind, knowing that we will provide you with a customized solution that perfectly meets your needs and most importantly, your budget.

From initial set-up and installation to maintenance and support, we pride ourselves on giving you unsurpassed customer service and 24/7 Technical Support every step of the way, rain or shine, hail or snow, 365 days a year. Our seasoned Engineers will work very closely with you to spec out your servers based on the needs or criteria of your business.

Coastline Micro’s Extended Warranty and Tech Support options are tailored to meet your specific requirements, allowing you the flexibility to be as hands-on or hands-off as you see fit.

We take the words “No job or order is too small for us” very seriously.

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Desktop

Desktops

Desktop Computer

A desktop computer is a personal computer in a form intended for regular use at a single location desk/table due to its size and power requirements, as opposed to a laptop whose rechargeable battery and compact dimensions allow it to be regularly carried and used in different locations. The most common configuration is a computer monitor, keyboard and mouse, and a case that houses the main components of the PC, namely the power supply, motherboard, hard drive, optical drive, and previously the floppy drive. The form factor of the case is typically an upright tower or (horizontal) desktop. All-in-one computers, that integrate the monitor and main PC components in one unit, are often categorized under the desktop computer umbrella, particularly if they require an external power source and separate keyboard/mouse. The desktop category has also encompassed home computers and workstations.

Prior to the widespread use of microprocessors, a computer that could fit on a desk was considered remarkably small; the type of computers most commonly used were minicomputers, which were themselves desk-sized. Early computers took up the space of a whole room. Minicomputers generally fit into one or a few refrigerator-sized racks.

The very first "programmable calculator/computer" was marketed in the second half of the 1960s starting with the Italian machinery Programma 101 (1965) computer at typewriter size.[1] More desktop models were introduced in 1971, leading to a model programmable in BASIC in 1972.[2] This one used a smaller version of a minicomputer design based on read-only memory (ROM) and had small one-line LED alphanumeric displays. They could draw computer graphics with a plotter.

Solution: High Density

High Density

High-density storage for data storage devices like floppy disks, CDs, DVDs, Blu-ray Discs, or HDDs refers to the amount of information they manage.

The first storage media, paper media and punched cards, were inefficient, slow, and bulky. These then gave the way to magnetic storage; core memory, drums and, finally, hard drives. For backup, there was removable media; magnetic tape reels and cartridges, floppy disks and removable hard drives. Later optics (CD Rom and DVD drives) supplanted magnetism for archival uses. Today's computers need to store more data than ever and most recent storage replaces moving parts with solid-state electronics.

The explosive increase in information and the miniaturization of electronic devices demand new recording technologies and materials that combine high density, fast response, long retention time and rewriting capability. As predicted, the current silicon-based computer circuits are reaching their physical limits. Further miniaturization of the electronic components and increase in data storage density are vital for the next generation of IT equipment such as ultra high-speed mobile computing, communication devices and sophisticated sensors. This original book presents a comprehensive introduction to the significant research achievements on high-density data storage from the aspects of recording mechanisms, materials and fabrication technologies, which are promising for overcoming the physical limits of current data storage systems. The book serves as an useful guide for the development of optimized materials, technologies and device structures for future information storage, and will lead readers to the fascinating world of information technology in the future.

Solution: Newest Features

Newest Features

The first storage media, paper media and punched cards, were inefficient, slow, and bulky. These then gave the way to magnetic storage; core memory, drums and, finally, hard drives. For backup, there was removable media; magnetic tape reels and cartridges, floppy disks and removable hard drives. Later optics (CD Rom and DVD drives) supplanted magnetism for archival uses. Today's computers need to store more data than ever and most recent storage replaces moving parts with solid-state electronics.

 

Solution: Small Business Servers

Small Business Servers

The first storage media, paper media and punched cards, were inefficient, slow, and bulky. These then gave the way to magnetic storage; core memory, drums and, finally, hard drives. For backup, there was removable media; magnetic tape reels and cartridges, floppy disks and removable hard drives. Later optics (CD Rom and DVD drives) supplanted magnetism for archival uses. Today's computers need to store more data than ever and most recent storage replaces moving parts with solid-state electronics.

 

Solution: Performance Work Stations

Performance Work Stations

The first storage media, paper media and punched cards, were inefficient, slow, and bulky. These then gave the way to magnetic storage; core memory, drums and, finally, hard drives. For backup, there was removable media; magnetic tape reels and cartridges, floppy disks and removable hard drives. Later optics (CD Rom and DVD drives) supplanted magnetism for archival uses. Today's computers need to store more data than ever and most recent storage replaces moving parts with solid-state electronics.